Downloads

We have compiled a collection of useful and informative First Aid documents, just choose the section and document of interest and download to your computer as required by clicking on the title.

Health and Safety

If you are an employee (full or part time, temporary or permanent), this information explains what your rights are, what you should expect from your employer, what responsibilities you have and where to go for help.

This guidance is for anyone who has duties under the COMAH Regulations 2015, particularly operators of establishments, and also others such as local authorities and emergency planners.

This guidance is for employers, duty holders and others who have responsibility for the control of workplaces, sites and premises. It is also for those operating equipment that requires verbal and/or non-verbal communications.

This leaflet describes how to control hazardous substances at work so that they do not cause ill health. It will help you understand what you need to do to comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002 (as amended) which apply to the way you work with these substances.

Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000. Approved Code of Practice and guidance.

Confined Spaces Regulations 1997. Approved Code of Practice, Regulations and guidance. his Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) and guidance is for those involved in work within confined spaces, those who employ or train such people and those that represent them.

Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998. Approved Code of Practice and guidance.

Healthcare and First Aid on offshore installations and pipeline works.

This leaflet is for those who need to put in place or oversee their organisation’s health and safety arrangements. The advice may also help workers and their representatives, as well as health and safety practitioners and training providers.

This leaflet explains what you, as an employer, may need to do to ensure your employees receive appropriate health and safety training. It gives advice on who may need training, what form the training may take and how to organise it. The leaflet will also be useful to employees and their representatives.

An at-a-glance report on the Health and Safety Statistics for 2013-14

The Health and Safety Commission (HSC) conducted a review of health and safety regulation in 1994. It found that people were confused about the differences between: • Guidance; • Approved Codes of Practice (ACOPs); and • Regulations and how they relate to each other.

This document provides a case study as an example of how to set up a Health and Safety policy using a template which can be downloaded from the HSE website.

If you think health and safety has to be complicated – it doesn’t. This guide will make it easier for you to comply with the law and manage health and safety in your business.

All workers have a right to work in places where risks to their health and safety are properly controlled. Health and safety is about stopping you getting hurt at work or ill through work. Your employer is responsible for health and safety, but you must help.

This document contains the list of workplace exposure limits for use with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (as amended).

This Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) and guidance provide practical advice on how to comply with the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 (DSEAR). These Regulations require the elimination or reduction of risk of fire and explosion from substances connected with work activities.

This book contains the Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (as amended) (COSHH) and covers all substances to which the Regulations apply.

Employers have a duty to consult with their employees, or their representatives, on health and safety matters. This leaflet is aimed at employers and discusses what they need to do to ensure they are complying with the law.

An at-a-glance report on the Health and Safety Statistics for 2012-13

This Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) and guidance provide practical advice on how to comply with the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 (DSEAR). These Regulations require the elimination or reduction of risk of fire and explosion from substances connected with work activities.

First Aid

Work-related dermatitis (also known as eczema) can cause serious problems. Many people live with pain and discomfort because of it and have had to give up work. It also results in millions of pounds being paid out to victims in compensation. However, by taking a sensible, positive approach to looking after health and safety, you could prevent work-related dermatitis and the associated problems in your workplace.

The guidance contained in this document was first published in 2004 and therefore makes no reference to the 'Fit Note'. We would ask readers of this guidance document to consider how the introduction of the 'Fit Note' has impacted on the good practice contained in it.

This guide will help you identify and select a competent training provider to deliver any first-aid training indicated by your first-aid needs assessment (under the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981).

Reporting accidents and incidents at work. A brief guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR).

This leaflet contains practical advice for you if you are off work sick and how your employer can help you and where you can get more advice.

This document provides you with practical information about occupational asthma. You may meet substances at work which could cause allergies if you breathe them in. Such substances are called respiratory sensitisers. They can quickly cause permanent damage to the nose, throat and lungs.

Many materials used at work can affect the skin or can pass through the skin and cause diseases elsewhere in the body. If you are an employer, health and safety adviser, trainer or safety representative you can help prevent these disabling diseases. This guidance will help you with practical advice.

This document provides useful information for small employers, an employee off work sick for more than 14 days is likely to be rare. But when it does happen, there are considerable benefits from working in partnership with your employees and their trade union and other employee representatives to help those off work sick to return to work.

This guidance is for employers. It sets out what you need to do to address first-aid provision in the workplace.

This leaflet answers some basic questions about first-aid provision at work. It is aimed at employers in small and medium-sized workplaces, but may be useful to all employers, managers and others involved in first aid at work.

Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981. Approved Code of Practice. This Approved Code of Practice gives practical advice on the requirements placed on employers and self-employed people by the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 to provide adequate first aid provisions to all mine workers.

If you are an employer or employee, self-employed or a safety representative, and involved in work where exposure to blood or other body fluids may occur, you should read this guidance.

This leaflet contains basic advice on first aid for use in an emergency. It is not a substitute for effective training but it will help you to understand the basic practise of first Aid in the workplace.

A guide for Occupational Health professionals

First Aid training courses

If you are not sure what additional training may be required, this document extracted from the L74 guidelines should help.